Introducing Chess to a Bright 6 Year Old

How do I introduce chess to a bright 6 year old? The great news is that youngsters tend to be fascinated immediately and most don’t need a lot of encouragement to continue once you’ve introduced them to the game. In fact, you may be surprised at the enthusiasm this idea generates. Some children however, may need the nudge, and I find it helpful to have a “game night” sort of routine once a week. By the way, this article assumes teaching chess to your kids at home. The concepts are similar for a classroom at school, but that’s not the focus here. So, how do you give the child, him or her, the best chance at enjoying the process of discovering this game, sticking with it for a while, and experiencing some good times with others? The ideal is exploring the game together. If you consider yourself a beginner player, why not learn along with your child? You’ll watch many moments of “oh, wow! really??” over new discoveries about how the pieces move, how they capture, special moves, and so on. I know, because I’m teaching my son Evan who’s 6 at this time, and it’s fun to look at the chessboard again through his young eyes as he grasps new concepts. You’ll also discover a lot about how your child learns best. That was a big eye opener for me. I found new ways of communicating ideas to him just by observing his learning style playing chess. And I think anyone can do this if they are patient. One of the biggest challenge areas for Evan is focus....

Giant Plastic Chess Set for Kids

Mini version of the giant chess set is 1 foot tall. 12″ all-weather plastic chess set is perfect for outdoor chess, fun for school, home, parties, and other occasions! Kids love the large pieces. Easy to transport, fun, and affordable. A real thrill with this super-cute chess set. Lay sewn, nylon mat on any flat surface even lawns with short grass. Just stake down the corner grommets. The pieces are strong and sturdy, yet not very heavy. In windy areas they might blow...

Why chessboards have algebraic coordinates

Those letters and numbers along the margin of many chessboards are the coordinate system for naming the squares, commonly called “algebraic notation”. Chessboards for learning or competition often have letters and numbers along each side with 1-8 horizontal ranks and A-H vertical files creating a coordinate system for recording a chess game on paper or electronically. The lower left square is A1 and the upper right square is H8, with all the squares having their own coordinate name. Nearly all standard vinyl roll-up chessboards will have this algebraic coordinates. It is not as common on wood chessboards although a popular model is shown. Beginners rely on the coordinate system printed on the chessboard to help them write down their moves, so it’s good for those starting out to start with an “algebraic” chessboard. Experts know the coordinate “names” of all 64 squares and don’t depend on the visual depiction of coordinates. These coordinates help players record their games my by move on a game recording sheet or “scoresheet”. Some chess rules for competitive chess depend on an accurately recorded chess game. Here are some reasons to record a chess game in notation. Save a record to replay the moves and review a game later with a coach and save a personal library of your games in a scorebook Know when a specific number of moves is reached, such as the 40th move, often used for a time control where a predetermined 2 hours is allowed for the first 40 moves and 1 hour is remaining for the rest of the game. If a game is disrupted for any reason,...

Girl plays giant chess set

A friend’s adorable young girl captivated by the chess pieces towering around her. While she didn’t score checkmate, she did win on cuteness. The 25″ giant chess pieces are perfect for both private backyards and public gatherings. The set has been so popular that Chess House sold out this summer. Take advantage of this with a $100 off pre-order discount on these giant chess pieces by merely paying now and taking delivery later (ships end of August).  This offer is valid through August...

Chess for Parents: Going Easy

If you find that you can easily win every game against your child, then I would strongly recommend doing the following. First, DO NOT play easy and make intentional mistakes – that frequently results in frustration in many situations. Instead, change the starting position and make it a challenge that will help your child learn and still be something that they can ‘win’ at. I would recommend starting the game with your child having all his/her pieces, and you having ONLY your king. Have your child count the number of moves it takes to checkmate your king, and write down the first time how many moves it takes for your child to do so. Then set a goal of how efficiently your child can checkmate you (should be able to do it in 10 or fewer moves). Once that becomes simple, then simply add all the pawns to your lone king – and once again track how many moves it takes for your child to win – and so on. Adding both the rooks as well as the pawns – then both knights instead of rooks perhaps, etc, etc. This can be a fun challenge as your child will legitimately win without one side intentionally making blunders, and slowly increase your child’s ability to plan and find the best moves.” Elliott Neff Elliott is the founder of Chess4Life and creator of the kid-friendly Chess School on DVD Series. The organization reaches thousands of kids and teaches life skills through...

Cost to Raise Family Up 53% Since 1995; Net Worth Nearly Cut in Half: Strategic Ways Families Can Succeed

Families now spend an average of $222,360 to raise a child from birth to age 17—a 53% increase over the past fifteen years. (1) That’s one person working full-time nearly six years to cover the expenses of raising one child! During the global financial crisis and ensuing recession, median family net worth fell by over 38% from 2007-2010. For many, that’s nearly two decades of savings wiped out in just a few years! These troublesome trends are requiring most of us to rethink our jobs, opportunities, income—and of course, our expenses. But in spite of the rising costs to raise a child, the decline in families’ average net worth and the intense social pressures facing your kids these days, remember this: You still have the same 6,205 days to raise your child from birth to age 17.  How you choose to spend that time as a family makes all the difference in your child’s life. Whether you’re already enjoying activities together as a family—or whether you need to make time in your active schedule—time together develops trust, respect and unity over the years, which contributes enormously to your child’s well being. As a result, any financial limitations your family faces become less inhibiting to your child’s future success. The question is, will you be controlled by a busy schedule resulting from increased financial stress—giving up time with your family during these crucial years you have with them—or will you make it a priority  to spend time together with your children to help them grow in considering others, making good decisions, thinking ahead and becoming self-sufficient? No one has a...